Using AAC devices for autism (Success Story) - Tobii Dynavox Global
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Brock’s story

Brock’s story

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Meet Brock

Six-year-old Brock loves to laugh and joke around. He will run, spin and jump for hours, unless he’s taking things apart just to see how they go back together. When Brock was a toddler, his mum and dad noticed that he had trouble getting his words out, an early sign of autism. After Brock was diagnosed, his parents learned about AAC (augmentative and alternative communication). As soon as he got his speech device, Brock was hooked. Now, he lets everybody know exactly what he’s thinking.

His vocabulary has grown tremendously, and we love seeing our lil’ man finally being able to speak his mind.

— Brock’s mother, Brianna

Young boy with autism using Tobii Dynavox AAC app and TD I-110 speech generating device with his SLT

Life with assistive technology

Brock’s Speech-Language Therapist, Emily, recommended assistive technology to the family. Brock uses the TD I-110, a touch screen speech generating device, to ask for juice, play with his little brother, Beau, and practice words he learns in school. Emily introduced Brock to the device in one of his favourite places: the hallways of his autism centre, where Brock’s first words were “go” and “run.” Now, Brock takes his TD I-110 wherever he goes. Using TD Snap communication software, Brock can explore page after page of colourful symbols that help him build vocabulary on trips to the zoo, the playground, and other fun places. Like many kids communicating with Picture Communication Symbols (PCS), he often switches between his device and print solutions, such as the communication boards posted on the walls at his centre, which are made with the same symbols found in TD Snap. This mix of high and low-tech AAC makes it easier for Brock to communicate and learn.

Young boy with autism using Tobii Dynavox AAC app and TD I-110 speech generating device with his SLP

Life with assistive technology

Brock's Speech-Language Therapist, Emily, recommended assistive technology to the family. Brock uses the TD I-110, a touch screen speech generating device, to ask for juice, play with his little brother, Beau, and practice words he learns in school. Emily introduced Brock to the device in one of his favourite places: the hallways of his autism centre, where Brock’s first words were “go” and “run.” Now, Brock takes his TD I-110 wherever he goes. Using TD Snap communication software, Brock can explore page after page of colourful symbols that help him build vocabulary on trips to the zoo, the playground, and other fun places. Like many kids communicating with Picture Communication Symbols (PCS), he often switches between his device and print solutions, such as the communication boards posted on the walls at his centre, which are made with the same symbols found in TD Snap. This mix of high and low-tech AAC makes it easier for Brock to communicate and learn.

The power of teams

Brock’s experience has been life-changing, not only for him, but for everyone who loves and cares about him. His mum, his dad, Beau, and Emily each help to nurture Brock’s unique way of communicating. Working with Emily at the centre, Brock has become more outgoing and engaged in speech therapy. To encourage him to use his TD I-110 at home, his parents frequently ask him questions that he can answer with familiar symbols. Beau often repeats what Brock says with his device to make sure his big brother feels heard. Now that Brock can speak his mind, his playful personality shines brighter than ever.